Liquids, Aerosols & Gels (LAGs)

 

 

Why 100ml or smaller containers?

The measures require passengers to pack any liquids, aerosols and gels that they wish to take in their carry-on baggage in a transparent and re-sealable plastic bag. 

There are several reasons for this:

  • the bag needs to be re-sealable for practical purposes
  • a re-sealable transparent bag allows Aviation Security Officers at the security screening point to easily inspect and open bags to check the contents and
  • to assist Aviation Security Officers to process passengers efficiently and to minimise delays

You can minimise the time it will take you to clear security screening by presenting at the screening point the correctly packed liquids, gels and aerosols that you wish to take in your carry-on baggage.

Can I choose my own plastic bag?

Passengers can choose the type of plastic bag that they wish to use as long as it meets the requirements of the additional screening measures.  The bag must be transparent, re-sealable and of a capacity not exceeding 1 litre (20cm x 20 cm or 15cm x 25cm) in volume.

Bags of this type, such as re-sealable sandwich bags, are readily available at most local supermarkets.

  • presenting a re-sealable transparent bag of the correct size will minimise the time that it takes you to clear security screening
  • remember, the bag needs to be presented separately from your other carry-on baggage at the security screening point
What will happen if I don't comply with the measures?

You may not be able to board your flight if you have any liquids, gels and aerosols in your carry-on luggage, unless these items are in containers of no more than 100ml and are in a transparent, re-sealable plastic bag.

You will be referred to your airline if you have any concerns.

 

Can I bring food from home to eat on the plane?

You can still bring food from home as long as it is solid in form. This includes, breads, fruit, vegetables, hard cheeses, biscuits cakes or muffins (without a cream, jam or liquid filling), or similar dry, firm or hard items.

You cannot bring food that is a liquid, jelly or a sauce, such as a casserole, stew, soup, curry, gravy, jams and preserves, pickled foods, honey, or yoghurt. 

If you are going to take your food items off the aircraft with you at your destination, make sure you are aware of the Customs and Biosecurity requirements in your destination country. 

For New Zealand’s Customs requirements, please contact the New Zealand Customs Service at www.customs.govt.nz 

For New Zealand’s Biosecurity requirements, please contact Biosecurity New Zealand, at www.biosecurity.govt.nz

There are exemptions in place for people with special dietary requirements, and for baby foods.  See below for details of these exemptions. 

Can I still take liquids, aerosols and gels in my hold luggage?

Yes, liquids, aerosols and gels in containers too large to be taken into the cabin as part of your carry-on baggage should be carefully packed in your hold baggage.

The usual restrictions to carrying Dangerous Goods still apply. Check www.caa.govt.nz or contact your airline for further information on Dangerous Goods.

If in doubt the best advice to follow is to pack all non-essential items, that is, items that you will not require for the duration of your flight, in your hold baggage (the luggage you ‘check in’ and do not have access to during the flight).

Why do I have to put my liquids, aerosols and gels in a re-sealable plastic bag?

The measures require passengers to pack any permitted liquids, aerosols and gels that they wish to take in their carry-on baggage in a transparent re-sealable 1 litre plastic bag. 

There are several reasons for this:

  • the bag needs to be re-sealable for practical purposes
  • a re-sealable transparent bag allows Aviation Security Officers at the security screening point to easily inspect and open bags to check the contents and
  • to assist Aviation Security Officers to process passengers efficiently and to minimise delays

You can minimise the time it will take you to clear security screening by presenting at the screening point the correctly packed liquids, aerosols and gels that you wish to take in your carry-on baggage.

What if my bag has a logo or design on it/

Your plastic bag must be free of large logos or motifs (where a bag does have a logo the reverse side must be clear).  This is because they have the potential to obscure items in the bag. 

If Aviation Security Officers cannot quickly check the contents of the plastic bag, you and other passengers will be delayed while your bag is opened and checked.

The white strip across the centre of many zip-lock plastic bags is acceptable

What size is allowed for creams, ointments, waxes, etc, that are measured in grams?

For the purposes of the liquids, aerosols and gels measures, 100 grams is considered the equivalent of 100ml. 

You can take any creams, ointments, waxes, etc, in containers up to 100g.

Am I able to put my liquids, aerosols and gels into other containers, ie, not the containers that I purchased them in?

Yes, you can transfer or decant liquids, aerosols and gels into other containers. However, the container that you use must have a volume no greater than 100ml. For example, you may not transfer or decant 100ml of a product, such as shampoo, into a container that holds 200ml. If you do this then you will not be permitted to take this item on board the aircraft with you.

It is important to remember that the normal restrictions for dangerous goods will still apply. More detailed information on the restrictions for dangerous goods is available on the CAA website at www.caa.govt.nz or you can also ask your airline.

What type of liquids, aerosols and gels do these measures cover?

These measures apply to any items that can be poured, sprayed or smeared or melt at room temperature. This includes, but is not limited, to:

  • water and other drinks, soups, syrups, jams, stews, sauces and pastes
  • foods in sauces or containing a high liquid content
  • creams or ointments - including face creams, foundation, sunblock, insect repellent
  • perfumes
  • roll-on deodorants
  • sprays - including antiperspirant and hair sprays
  • gels - including hair, shaving and shower gels
  • contents of pressurised containers - including shaving foam
  • pastes - including toothpastes
  • waxy substances - including hair wax
  • liquid solid mixtures - including lipsticks, face compacts and blushers
  • mascara and liquid eyeliner and
  • lip gloss and lip balm
  • liquid soaps 
  • fluid filled cigarette lighters

These or similar items can only be taken in carry-on baggage on board aircraft in containers of 100ml or less, with all containers fitting into the resealable transparent 1 litre plastic bag.  This bag must then be presented separately at the security screening point.

Passengers can still pack as many of these items as they like, in any quantity, in their hold baggage. The usual restrictions relating to dangerous goods still apply. See http://www.caa.govt.nz/  for further information or contact your airline.

If you are only travelling with carry-on baggage, you must still comply with these measures.

Can I take an empty water bottle and fill it up at the airport?

Yes, you can take an empty bottle, and fill it up once you have been through security screening. 

Please note that you will not be able fill your bottle prior to the security screening point.  You will still be able to purchase ready filled containers of water after passing through the security screening process.

Can I take my wedding cake on my flight?

You can take a wedding cake as long as it is solid, and does not have a liquid, cream or jam filling.

Why do the additional measures apply to all of these items?

The measures apply to a wide variety of items as there are so many different types of liquids, aerosols and gels that could be used as explosives.

Existing technology for testing for liquid explosives is not developed enough to enable every liquid, aerosol and gel carried by passengers to be quickly analysed at the airport.  Because it will be too slow to test every item, the new measures apply to all liquids, aerosols and gels except for those in quantities too small to make dangerous explosive devices.